March is TBI month (Traumatic Brain Injury), a month dedicated to raising awareness about this often misunderstood and undiagnosed condition that affects thousands of people each year. According to the CDC, roughly 150 Americans die each day due to TBI-related injuries.

What is a Traumatic Brain Injury?

A TBI is an injury that occurs due to a sudden sharp blow or jolt to the head. The impact of the collision causes damage to the brain tissue.

Is a Traumatic Brain Injury the same as a concussion?

A concussion is a type of TBI that typically involves the loss of consciousness.

How do Traumatic Brain Injuries occur?

TBIs occur in a wide variety of circumstances, including sports injuries, car accidents, falls, and assaults.

What are the warning signs of a Traumatic Brain Injury?

In some situations, it may be challenging to know if you have a TBI. Symptoms of TBIs may show up immediately or may take several days or weeks to appear. Further, symptoms vary depending on the severity of the injury.

In general, symptoms to look for include:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Changes in sleep patterns

In more severe cases, symptoms may include:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • Seizures
  • Slurred speech

For a complete list, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/symptoms.html

Is there treatment for Traumatic Brain Injuries?

Treatment exists for TBIs, but it is crucial to see a doctor as soon as possible if you believe you may have sustained an injury. Treatment may include therapy, surgery, and/or rehabilitation. Left untreated, the effects of a TBI worsen overtime and may lead to substantial cognitive, communicative, and behavioral changes.

For more information about TBIs, please visit the CDC at TBI: Get the Facts.

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